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the cold war in the post cold war the philippines and australia in particular to bear some of the burden. that's what i mean by an empire. i'm going to let the audience discover for your questions with the major conclusion of the book is the latest want to ask you before we turn it over what you -- you are walking away from america's historical a central role of the superpower, and you are talking about inevitable, necessary, a decline, and how would you respond. they want the american influence to extend long into the decade that they cannot do that bearing the same level of burden. of vladimir putin against china at the same time that what countries like vietnam and the philippines drag us into a war with china, over the sea is so azoff plater balancing triet in any case, the u.s. has so much oil deposits in texas, louisiana, oklahoma or other places i can name but we are doing to be -- because of energy reserves we are going to be a significant power for decades to come in any case, now is to get allies and others like minded to do more. >> this book has on the cover a blurb from henr
, the philippine-american war. but -- spanish american war and ended up in 2012. but we started in the series now. the book two years into the series, we decided, this is getting very serious, and we know i'm going to be called on this because of my background and making movies. going to say this is part fiction, part fantasy, but we decided to go with this book, and it -- peter took over the book. i was running the film, and we were cross-speaking all the time and checking each other constantly. i took about four and a half, five years now, and that where we are today. >> want to add to that? >> we've been friends for that whole period, since 1996. and then we decided we were going to go ahead with this project, and i thought we could do it in that year, a 60-minute documentary. i went to see oliver in new york two week later, and a ten-hour series, what i thought would take one semester and took four and a half years. so it's been a big project. it was important for us to have the book. i was suppressed how little information you can convey in a 60-minute documentary. so the book, it was an 800
determine prospects for peace or war. in visiting thailand and the philippines in october, i was reminded of the economic vitality of southeast asia and the fact that that tend countries comprise an asean represent now the fourth largest export market of the united states. these countries are center stage. we must stand firm with our friends throughout asia and actively pursue prospects for free trade and open sea lanes and other policies that will strengthen american economic growth. more broadly, we face the specter of global resource constraints, especially efficiencies of energy and food that could stimulate conflict and deepen poverty. we have made startling gains in domestic energy production, but we remain highly vulnerable still to our dependency on oil, and perhaps equally important, even if we were able to produce more energy at home, we cannot isolate ourselves from energy shocks in the global economy. we have to cooperate with other nations in improving the global system of manufacturing and moving energy supplies. currently, a key to this is helping to assure the completion o
nation. our top story as we go around the world in 80 seconds. philippines. rivers overflowing their banks. flooding roads in the central part of the nation. three people from one family reportedly killed when a tree fell on their house. thousands of people evacuated to temporary shelters. the storm comes three weeks after a huge typhoon devastated the south, killing more than a thousand people. >>> peru. torrential rain flooding the central amazon, driving hundreds of families out of their homes to higher grounds. the raging water uprooting trees and stranding vehicles. please and locals forming a human chain to rescue people from a flooded road. >>> nicnicaragua. government officials ordering people within a two mile radius to prepare to leave. the same volodymyr erup volcand earlier this year. >>> china. a huge fish tank holding sharks burst wide open at a shopping mall. security video capturing the moment the glass broke. saturdays of glass covering some shoppers. local media reporting several people with injuries from cuts to a broken leg. some of those lem on sharks, fish
and the next barrier central philippines fox rebellion. another one letter quarto canal at iwo jima, the next one marked tuscon incheon and chosin reservoir in the following marked caisson, da nang and weighs city. the next-to-last one marked beirut, kuwait and somalia and the final barrier carried the names of some in of the marine corps's most recent battles, nasiriyah, baghdad and fallujah. as we exit the wire, suddenly the the battle name stops and we became part of history ourselves. now it's strange to think that just 11 years ago, last night, we all went to bed peacefully without any notions the following morning we were going to be thrown ready or not into what became the longest war in american history and it's hard now for me to imagine words like fallujah and nasiriyah and al-qaim without having some sort of emotional response. it's hard to remember what it was like to think about a date like september 11, without all the emotions it brings up. is also equally difficult to remember all my classmates and we were all like before this great burden of four was placed on our shoulders f
to the two elements. this is not -- in south china sea, china is trying to advance. with the philippines and vietnam and other countries. they claim the islands at least in south china sea. east china sea there is an issue with japan. and from japan, -- [inaudible] the taiwan, the philippines, this is called -- from the viewpoint of china. violence exists in the pacific. china openly express their strong interest in the maritime security and also the territory along those islands. so these china sea, this is not isolated when. this is a kind of china military strategy to advance. >> that's an important point. which are basically saying this is about power. and a powerful which china is going to become more powerful. they are powerful to write history. we write history. you are seeing lines challenge, and i remember talking to george soros once when, after he so go the back of england, wrote the bank of england and what he saw as a hedge fund manager as a chance to basically drive so hard against the line that fundamentally the institutional power on the bank of england site had to collap
three years. you look at relations with vietnam, with the philippines, with australia to a certain degree, with japan in a rapid way in a slightly different fashion. so the u.s. has been lucky enough, in fact, to have been invited back. i can remember living in asia in the '90s during the time when prime minister mahathir was writing books about asian values and the like. and that was very prevalent in asia and singapore. and that really has all drifted into the background these days. you know, the region wants america back there. you know, how you -- in what form and how you balance it and the diplomacy that goes with that is obviously very delicate. but i don't think it's the u.s. rushing back in to confront china so much as a diplomatic opening opening up for washington in the region. >> to the extent - >> how does -- well, go ahead. >> there really are two key features here to asian politics. every country in asia wants a better relationship with china. and they seek it in all aspects of their diplomacy. but it is also the fact that now, as richard indicates, really every count
is known as a partisanship. i will never forget in the philippines, your efforts on the floor -- you had this amazing ability and sense of purpose in finding common ground and reaching out to people on both sides of the aisle. every member of the committee has joined in presenting you a resolution, and i just want to read, just the introduction. throughout his 36 years in the united states senate, richard lugar has served indiana and the united states with grace, distinction, and resolve, and will have many more contributions to the nation that he reveres. we want to present this to you. [applause] >> thank you. thank you very much. mr. chairman, i thank you very much. i am very grateful to have this opportunity -- to have had the opportunity to serve with each and everyone of you. thank you for this special privilege. >> finally, we are also going to be losing jim webb and jim demint. jim came here and did something that very few freshmen can do in getting a major piece of legislation passed, the new gi bill. on the committee, he has been critical to our thinking about the far east. he
, and it stands as an amazing legacy. but i will always remember the work we did on the philippines. your efforts on the floor, you've always had this amazing humility and sense of purpose in finding the common ground and reaching out to people on both sides of the i'm. every member of the committee has joined in presenting you with a resolution, and i just want to read just the introduction. whereas throughout his 36 years in the united states senate richard hue garre has served indiana, the united states with grace, distinction and tenacity and will have many more contributions to a nation still he reveres and that reveres him. and we want to present this to you, everybody on the committee, my friend. [applause] >> mr. chairman, i thank you very much. i'm very grateful to have had this opportunity to serve with each one of you. thank you. it's a very special tribute. >> thank you, sir. well, it's small compare today your service, but we honor you. and then, finally, we're also going to be losing jim webb and jim demint. jim, as we all know, jim webb came here, did something very few freshmen ca
now, it's a guy they found on youtube, in the philippines. he was a karaoke singer. he's fantastic. >> kelly: that's the tway to do it these days. >> clayton: back in the days, typically when you went on a date, maybe go to match.com, you look at their qualities, maybe look at their appearance. >> kelly: i think so. >> clayton: their likes, their interests. do they like to walk the dog in the park or that sort of thing. now there is a new trend unfolding and it's fascinating because some counselors have been coming forward, basically saying they're gotting more questions than ever before as it relates to dating about credit score. forget how they look. forget if they walk a dog in the park. i want to know how your credit score is because you know what? it tells a lot about your financial history and therefore, i might not want to date you. >> juliet: it doesn't necessarily tell you everything about a person and their integrity and character. people go through divorces and that gets messy. why are you giving me a look? >> kelly: no, i think it says something about the bottom line, t
it -- and partners such as singapore and the philippines and expanding our dialogue and -- in exchanges with china. we are also an handed our presence and capabilities in the region. that includes -- expanding our presence and capabilities in the region. that includes allocating our naval fleet to have a 60/40 s plit between the pacific and atlantic oceans, increasing army and marine presence in the region. locating our most advanced aircraft in the pacific, including new deployments of f- 22's and the mv22's to japan. and lay the groundwork for the first overseas deployment of the f-35 joint strike fighter. the third element of our strategy is that as we do force projection in the asia-pacific and middle east, we still have to maintain our global leadership and presence by building innovative partnerships and partner capacity across the globe and using these innovative rotational deployment as a way to do exercises and training with other countries, developing their capabilities so they can provide for their own security. in latin america, africa, europe, and elsewhere. the past decade of war has
such as singapore and the philippines. and expanding our mil-to-mil dialogue in exchanges with china. we are also enhancing our presence and capabilities in the region. that includes reallocating the naval fleet to achieve in these next few years a 60/40 split between the pacific and the atlantic oceans. hopefully, we will do that by 2020. increasing army and marine presence in the region after iraq and afghanistan, locating our most advanced aircraft in the pacific including new deployments of f-22s and the mv-22 ospreys to japan. and laying the groundwork for the first overseas deployment of the f-35 joint strike fighter in 2017. the third element of our strategy that as we do force projection in the asia pacific and in the middle east, we still have to maintain our global leadership and presence by building innovative partnerships and partner capacity across the globe and using these innovative rotational deployments as a way to do exercises and training with other countries, developing their capabilities so that they can help provide for their own security. in latin america, in africa, in the
Search Results 0 to 11 of about 12